7 buildings so absurd that they seem almost impossible

Shirley Marie Bradby

January 03, 2018

7 buildings so absurd that they seem almost impossible
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If the endless towers of Dubai or the beautiful "vertical forests" leave you speechless (literally and metaphorically), certainly you cannot help but be enthralled by the eight examples of "impossible" architecture that we have selected in this photo gallery.

Many of them do not date back to recent times but are the result of the visionary genius of architects in times when computer renderings were still an idea thought to be purely science fiction.

If you had the chance, which one would you buy?

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Keret House (Poland)

Keret House (Poland)

Panek/Wikimedia

It is known as the narrowest house in the world! In fact, it measures 5 ft (1.52 meters) at its widest point and less than 3 ft (one meter) at its narrowest point. In spite of any negative predictions, however, within the house, there is space (almost) for all the creature comforts you need!

準建築人手札網站 Forgemind ArchiMedia/Flickr

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Gate Tower Building (Osaka)

Gate Tower Building (Osaka)

DVMG/Wikimedia

It seems that the origin of this curious structure should be sought in a no-holds-barred fight between a builder and the highway company. Since the route of the elevated highway could not be changed and the builder would not give up, it was decided to pass the highway through the inside of the building. Nothing is impossible in Japan!

Floating House (France)

Floating House (France)

Pierre/FLickr

The use of water as a basis for a building is a thought that fascinates architects all over the world. This beautiful example is found in France, but many such houses are found where geological conditions allow it. Note the large windows, from which you can see the mirrored and fascinating body of water.

Crooked House (USA)

Crooked House (USA)

Don McCullough/Flickr

This charming building is located in North Carolina, but unfortunately, it is in a state of semi-abandonment (it seems to be for sale). A stilt house, as you can imagine, needs continuous maintenance, and in this case, the salt and the water in constant movement is doing a great job of dismantling the house. Someone buy it before it's too late!

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Maunsell Sea Forts (Great Britain)

Maunsell Sea Forts (Great Britain)

Russss/Wikimedia

Originally they were military fortresses built during World War II on the Thames and Mersey rivers to sight the German army. A part of them was destroyed during the conflict, but some were then occupied in various ways. In general, today they are in a state of neglect, and it is a real shame!

Casa do Penedo (Portugal)

Casa do Penedo (Portugal)

Pablo García Chao/Wikimedia

Built in the early 1970s, this particular dwelling called " was created by combining four giant boulders. For a long time, it was used by the owners as a residence, but after being abandoned, it has become a museum much loved by tourists.

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Old Mill House (France)

Old Mill House (France)

Pablo altes/Wikimedia

The structure was built in the sixteenth century and was originally made entirely of wood. Weather and atmospheric agents have made it necessary to replace the base structure, now it is in iron and cement, but the overall composition has remained unchanged; It is not surprising that a jewel like this, located in Normandy, straddling the Seine, attracted the attention of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet.

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